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107 Years Ago We Were Shown A Way To Think About Everything

On this day in 1915 Albert Einstein published his theory of general relativity and, after a few years when it was experimentally proven, changed how we see ourselves within the universe. In fact it changed how we think everything started, yup the Big Bang is a logical extension of this momentous paper released 107 years ago today.
General relativity, also known as the general theory of relativity and Einstein's theory of gravity, is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915 and is the current description of gravitation in modern physics. General relativity generalizes special relativity and refines Newton's law of universal gravitation, providing a unified description of gravity as a geometric property of space and time or four-dimensional spacetime. In particular, the curvature of spacetime is directly related to the energy and momentum of whatever matter and radiation are present. The relation is specified by the Einstein field equations, a system of second order partial differential equations.
General theory of relativity field equations as a tattoo
Einstein had already had his "miracle year" ten years earlier in 1905 by publishing a series of papers that would transform the way we see the universe. They included his theory of special relativity and the famous equation E=mc².

Special theory of relativity vs his general theory, what's the difference?
The theory of relativity usually encompasses two interrelated theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity, proposed and published in 1905 and 1915, respectively. Special relativity applies to all physical phenomena in the absence of gravity. General relativity explains the law of gravitation and its relation to other forces of nature. It applies to the cosmological and astrophysical realm, including astronomy.
So there ya go, 107 years ago the theory of relativity was 'complete'. And today I noticed the following headline, Einstein’s Theory of Relativity Passes Strict Test Using Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory.

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